This month, David wrote about “Life from the Dead,” pointing to the power, the purpose and the message of hope that we have because of Jesus’ Resurrection. I hope that you will look at the expanded Old and New Testament Scripture chart we have about hopes, hints and biblical examples of God’s power over death.

I wanted to share another verse with you that isn’t on the chart. It’s not there because it has nothing to do with Resurrection, not directly that is. And yet, I found it sparked an unexpected and glorious resurrection connection in my heart.

I was reading from the Psalms when I came across this familiar verse: “The lines have fallen to me in pleasant places; indeed I have a good inheritance” (Psalm 16:6). 

I began to think of how my father wanted to give his kids as much as he could while he was still alive, to see us enjoy it. He also knew that it’s hard to enjoy an inheritance when you are missing the loved one that left it to you.

I thought about the nature of inheritances, and the sad truth that receiving our full inheritance usually comes with grief over a loved one. Then my attention snapped back to the verse. I found myself asking, in what way might a “good inheritance” from God apply to us as believers today? A thought came to me—and it almost knocked me off my rocking chair.

When Jesus died, I inherited His righteousness.*

I was incredibly wowed by this “good inheritance.” And I could see how, in a sense, the Resurrection was like the reading of His will—proof that Christ’s righteousness was “in the bank,” and that God now sees it as mine—and yours if you are His child.

But the best part is, when Jesus rose from the dead, He didn’t take back our inheritance. We get to keep it… and He has the pleasure of seeing us enjoy it. (I read Isaiah 53:10-11 with that in mind now.)

A lot of thoughts have since come to mind as I ponder having inherited Jesus’ righteousness. I won’t list them because if you find yourself excited about the idea, you can think and pray about it and see what you and God make of it together. If you do, and you want to share your thoughts about this, I’d love to hear from you.

Ruth Rosen,

editor 

* I don’t claim to be a theologian or scholar of any kind. I know that Jesus’ righteousness was imputed to us—and that’s a more precise and theologically correct way to say it. But the simple thought that came to me packed such a personal and powerful punch that I wanted to share it with you, in hopes that you also would be wowed by the idea of our spiritual inheritance.