If you liked last week’s stories from our New York summer outreach, you’ll love these!

Levi: “We set up a prayer board at Madison Square Park. A married couple walked past and then returned as the husband encouraged his wife to post a prayer. I spoke to her about the gospel, and in the end she prayed with me to surrender her life to Jesus! Also, a woman named Robin shared with me that she’d been diagnosed a month ago with lymphoma. She also prayed to receive Jesus right there on the spot, and said she felt a tangible touch from God.”

Dan

Dan: “We were caught in the rain while handing out water in Washington Square Park. A guy and a girl were walking by, not especially interested in the water. But when I pointed out that it was free, they decided to take one, and stopped to talk. The girl was raised Methodist and the guy is Jewish. He goes to a Shabbat meal almost every week, but isn’t terribly religious. He’s interested in coming to our Shabbat dinner, so I’ve texted him already to follow up. Please pray for him.”

Rachelle: “95-year-old Rose is from Flushing, New York. Her mom died when she was two, and she was adopted by a family who raised her Catholic. When she fell in love with a Jewish guy, her adopted family told her that she was actually Jewish, so she married the man and raised a Jewish family. Her husband has since passed away. Rose gave us her contact info and is open to a visit.”

Aden: “I met Manny* on a Friday afternoon in Brooklyn, where we were asking people, ‘What does Shabbat mean to you?’ Manny was once part of the Chabad community, a very religious Jewish sect. He has walked away from that community and is now a local artist. He answered that, for him, Shabbat always meant family. I have also come out of Chabad, so could relate well to Manny. He gave us his contact for further follow-up.”

Elizabeth: “I met Annabelle in Williamsburg as she charged her phone at our charging station. Her parents divorced when she was young. Her dad is Orthodox, but her mother isn’t. She had never heard of Jews for Jesus, so she was curious. She gave her phone number and said she’d love to get together and talk. She’s moving to DC in about three weeks and I hope she will be willing to hear from our team there.”

Ketzia and Diane (from Halutzim, our high school-aged missions team): “We met Ethan, a Catholic guy, with his two friends. He said his friends kept talking to him about Jesus, so when he ran into us, he saw it as a sign. Then when we were getting on the subway, we met a Jewish family with a13-year-old son who was about to have his bar mitzvah in a few weeks. The son had pointed out our T-shirts, so the whole family came over to ask what it meant to be Jews for Jesus. We got to tell them about our own bat mitzvahs, and our faith in Jesus the Messiah.”

Amer

Amer: “We were giving out iced coffee at St. Mark’s in the East Village when Aden came over with a young man named Russ.* Russ was about 21 years old, from Long Island, was raised traditionally Jewish and had attended Yeshiva. I explained my journey and why I believed Jesus is the Messiah, after which he said, ‘Yes, Aden was telling me some things about Jesus that corroborate your story, and he had a pretty compelling argument.’ Russ said he is willing to look at scriptures together and gave us his contact details. Pray that he will be compelled by God’s grace to trust in Jesus.”

Eryn: “I met Ben,* a former ‘amateur anti-missionary.’ He started out very hostile, saying that all of us should die. We talked for an hour and he ended up giving me his first name and email, saying that he would be interested in continuing the conversation about Jesus.

“I also met Chava* who is 20 years old, from Manchester, England and recently moved to Brooklyn. She grew up Orthodox but has recently given up her faith. She wants to meet with Elizabeth (my wife) and talk about what we believe. She said she realizes that she grew up sheltered and she didn’t want to keep dismissing things that she hadn’t bothered to understand. Please pray for her salvation.”

*Not their real names.