One of our Co-Laborers (trained volunteers), Ron Neumann McDevitt, shared this great story:

“A few years ago I met Norman at a park in Melbourne, Florida. We quickly discovered we’d both lived in the same New Jersey Jewish neighborhood. We had much in common and we hit it off right away.

“He gave me his address so I could drop by and continue our chat. A week later I went to see him, but the lady who answered the door told me Norman didn’t live there. Turns out the address he’d given me was for an entire complex, and not realizing that, I hadn’t thought to ask if there was an apartment number. I thought, ‘Oy vey. I will never find him again.’

“But I figured since I was there I would knock on a few more doors, hoping either to find Norman or tell other people about Jesus. I knocked on the very next door and asked the lady who answered if Norman lived there. She said he didn’t, but that he happened to be there, eating.

“I thought, ‘This can’t be the same Norman,’ but it was! He came outside and showed me where he lived, in another building behind the one where we stood. I never would have found it!

“It was amazing, how I didn’t know his apartment number but ‘happened’ to find him in someone else’s! I went back to see Norman that night to share the gospel with him. I began visiting him regularly. About six months later, Norman prayed with me to receive Jesus as his Messiah and Savior. Within weeks his sister, who lives with him, also prayed with me to receive Christ.

“I talked to them about baptism, but they said they were not ready for that.* I continued to hold personal Bible studies with Norman and his sister on a regular basis. They have helped me on several outreaches. 

“This past week they told me they were ready to get baptized. It was wonderful to see them both baptized and to hear them tell afterward how glad they were that they did it. It is exciting to see people grow in the Lord!”

Please pray for Norman and his sister to continue growing in the Lord.

* Many Jewish people, even after they identify publicly as believers in Jesus, struggle with baptism. It’s commonly misunderstood as a ritual that means one is no longer Jewish.