We thought you might like to see excerpts from the prayer that Stan Meyer mentioned in his article. Jewish people the world over will be reciting this on Yom Kippur (which begins at sundown on September 27).

Our God and God of our ancestors! Let our prayers come before You and do not hide Yourself from our supplication. For neither are we so arrogant nor hardened to say, We are righteous and have not sinned,” for truly, truly, we have sinned. May it be Your will, O Lord our God, to forgive all our sins, and pardon all our iniquities.

    For the sin which we have committed in Your sight through arrogance of our will,
And for the sin which we have committed before You by breach of trust.
For the sin which we have committed in Your sight by casting off responsibility,
And for the sin which we have committed before You by denying and lying.
For the sin which we have committed in Your sight by evil thoughts,
For all of these, O God of forgiveness,
forgive us, pardon us, grant us atonement.

    For the sin which we have committed in Your sight, either knowingly or unknowingly.
And for the sin which we have committed before You through lustful desires.
And for the sin which we have committed before You by not lifting up Your Name.
And for the sin which we have committed before You by passing judgment.
And for the sin which we have committed before You by resisting those in authority.
For all of these, O God of forgiveness,
forgive us, pardon us, grant us atonement.

    For the sin which we have committed in Your sight by scoffing,
And for the sin which we have committed before You through talking idly.
And for the sin which we have committed before You through excess in eating and drinking.
For the sin which we have committed in Your sight by yet being proud,
And for the sin which we have committed before You through our lack of zeal.
For all of these, O God of forgiveness,
forgive us, pardon us, grant us atonement.

    Avinu Malkeinu (our Father, our King), we have sinned before You!
Avinu Malkeinu, in Your abundant mercy, cleanse us of our guilt before You.
Avinu Malkeinu, bring us back to You in perfect repentance.
Our Father, our King, be gracious unto us and answer us although we have no merits of our own. Deal with us in righteousness and lovingkindness, and save us.

These excerpts are from the traditional Jewish prayer for forgiveness known as the Al Chet. Jews and Gentiles who believe in Jesus can recite these prayers with a sense of remorse and relief, knowing that, “In Him we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace” (Ephesians 1:7).