QUESTION:

Why does Jews for Jesus call its summer street evangelism a campaign? Isn’t campaign a military term? Also, instead of street ministry, why don’t you carry on your evangelism in a more dignified manner?

ANSWER:

The first answer is simple, and the second is contiguous with the first. In military terms, a campaign is a planned and sustained advance. In Christian terms, this world is the devil’s stronghold, and trying to win souls to Christ is our planned aggressive action against him. In evangelism, we battle with the evil one for the liberation of unbelievers’ souls, and our campaign tactics are designed to give us the upper hand in this battle.

As for the second question, in evangelism it is not a matter of doing the dignified thing, but the necessary thing. We need bold tactics to challenge those who assume they have heard everything they ought to know about Jesus and think they have entirely settled the matter in their minds.

A street witnessing campaign accomplishes what cannot be achieved through more passive means of evangelism. It heightens consciousness, raises questions in people’s minds and confronts them with the issue of whether they really hold the right view of Jesus.

Our name or slogan Jews for Jesus causes people to do a double take. In turn, this leads to a greater consciousness that ours is not the regular “trite” message they think they already know. People have learned to expect surprise from our ministry— and perhaps the best surprise of all is that some unbelievers who have always thought they would never consider Jesus are heeding our message.