So what? Why struggle is often good

Igor Spivak’s article, “The Struggle,” is personal. As a missionary in Kharkov, he faces situations that no lay person, much less a lay person living in the United States, is forced to confront. Yet the underlying struggle he has written about is one that every disciple of Jesus faces.

When it comes to spiritual warfare, the fact is, if we’re not fighting, we’re losing—not the war, (Jesus already won it) but the battle in which we’re deployed. And frankly, if it’s difficult to discern any sign of battle, it probably means that the enemy is not wasting ammunition on us because we’re, well, losing just fine on our own. Not good.

Any time we are trying to live for the Lord, trying to reach others with the truth of the gospel, trying to meet a different standard than what the world expects, we’re in for a struggle. We have to pull away or push back from our own inclinations and we struggle continually against spiritual forces that use subtle ways to keep us from gaining much ground for the Kingdom of God.

Even as a missionary I am challenged by Igor’s statements about not being content to write people off when they say they are not interested. We truly don’t want to make pests of ourselves or disrespect people. But I have to ask myself, how much of what I’m feeling is “that would be disrespectful” and how much is “I’ve already been rejected and don’t need to come back for more.”

If I’m honest, I know how to approach people in ways that convey my respect, even after they’ve rejected me. So then, the struggle I face is not that I’m fearful of treating someone disrespectfully. The real struggle is I know that many people need more than one opportunity to get over their initial reaction before they are willing to consider the message. And as a messenger, I don’t enjoy that prospect.

It’s so easy to be just plain deceived about our own motivations and what we really feel. And that, too, is part of the struggle.

I have certain “go to” prayers that I bring to God on an ongoing basis. Among them, “God, help me see what you want me to see. Help me know what you want me to know. Help me say what you want me to say.” The struggle doesn’t end. But struggle is good. It means we haven’t given in.

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Ruth Rosen | San Francisco

Newsletter Editor, Missionary

Ruth Rosen, daughter of Jews for Jesus founder Moishe Rosen, is a staff writer and editor with Jews for Jesus. Her parents raised her with a sense of Jewishness as well as "Jesusness." Ruth has a degree in biblical studies from Biola College in Southern California and has been part of our full-time staff since 1979. She's toured with Jewish gospel drama teams and participated in many outreaches. She writes and edits quite a few of our evangelistic resources, including many broadside tracts. One of her favorites is, "Who Needs Politics." Ruth also helps other Jewish believers in Jesus tell their stories. That includes her father, whose biography she authored in what she says was "one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of my life." For details, or to order your copy of Called to Controversy the Unlikely Story of Moishe Rosen and the Founding of Jews for Jesus, click here. Or click here for a video desription of the biography. For the inside story and "extras" about the book, check out our Called to Controversy Facebook page. Ruth also writes shorter "faith journey" stories in books like Jewish Doctors Meet the Great Physician as well as in booklets like From Generation to Generation: A Jewish Family Finds Their Way Home, which you can download for free here. She edits the Jews for Jesus Newsletter and RealTime for Christians who want to pray for our ministry and our missionaries. In her spare time, Ruth enjoys writing fiction and playing with her dog, Annie, whom she "rescued" from a shelter. Ruth says, "Some people say that rescue dogs have issues, and that is probably true. If dogs could talk, they'd probably say that people have issues, and that is probably even more true. I'm glad that God is in the business of rescuing people, (and dogs) despite—or maybe because of—all our issues." You can follow Ruth Rosen on facebook or as RuthARosen on twitter.

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Connect with Jews for Jesus. No matter where you are on the journey of life, whether you’re Jewish or non-Jewish, a believer in Jesus or not – we want to hear from you. Chat with someone online or connect via our contact page below.  
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