suffering servant

To whom does the Prophet Refer?
Author: Rich Robinson

Aaron Trank’s conclusions may surprise some. But what does the text itself say? There are in fact valid reasons to see applications of Isaiah 53 to Israel as well as to the Messiah. First, Isaiah often identifies the servant as Israel, yet in some way as apart from Israel. In Isaiah 41:8, 44:1, 44:21, 45:4 […]

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Jesus and Jewish Suffering: a Perspective from Paris
Author: Joshua Turnil

If one were to give a hard and honest look at the heritage of Israel’s heroes, one would be forced to concede that it is not a triumphant past. Moses, at his apogee, came down from a holy mountain experience only to be “welcomed” by collective and unmitigated disloyalty in the shadow of the infamous […]

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Jesus and Jewish Suffering: an Israeli Perspective
Author: Dan Sered

Suffering is international and cross-cultural. It is something that unites all human beings, because we all experience it at one point or another. Therefore, suffering is not specifically Jewish—although in Jewish history there has been a great deal of suffering. My country, Israel, was birthed from the pain of one of humanity’s greatest experiences of […]

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The Suffering of Jesus and the Suffering of Israel A Reflection on Isaiah 53
Author: Aaron Trank

Yet it was the will of the Lord to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand. Out of the anguish of his soul he shall see […]

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Who is the Shammash?

Shammash is a Hebrew word that means servant. In the Jewish community, shammash (also spelled “shammas”) commonly refers to the sexton—the person who manages the synagogue facilities and keeps things running smoothly. In the Middle Ages the term referenced a more prestigious position. The shammash helped to conduct prayer, lead the worship services and even […]

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The Crucified Chicken?
Author: Rich Robinson

Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year, falls in 2009 on September 28 (but begins the previous evening). In English it is known as the Day of Atonement. On this day, many Jews whether religious or secular, will be in the synagogue praying to God to forgive their sins. They will listen to the chanting of the cantor and participate in responsive readings. Many will fast; some will walk to synagogue rather than drive; some will not wear leather shoes. A very few will do something many Jews are unfamiliar with: shlogn kapores

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God With Us
Author: Ruth Rosen

Do you ever think about what it cost God to be with us? We used to get what I’d call serial crank calls” from a man who was beside himself at the thought of God coming to earth in the flesh. He would leave long messages asking us in various colorful ways if we really […]

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Past Oppression, Present Excuse?
Author: Ruth Rosen

What can happen when we take our sufferings out of their historical context.

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New Beginnings

A message given by Dr. Douglas Nelson during the High Holidays at the Reform Jewish Congregation, Temple Beth Shalom in San Juan, Puerto Rico on September 13, 1985. I was so very pleased to receive your cordial invitation to speak this evening. It is an honor to address you on this joyful occasion. I appreciate […]

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The Rabbis’ Dilemma: A Look at Isaiah 53

We have a glorious future and an abundant present if we appropriate the salvation made possible by the One who “was wounded through our transgressions and bruised through our iniquities.”

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