Last month’s nightmarish bloodshed in Kiev is over, at least for now. We wanted to get you up to date on the following:

What happened to Tolik’s car? Branch leader Anatoli, aka Tolik, was visiting his contacts downtown as things grew progressively more chaotic and dangerous. By the time he was ready to go home, traffic was completely gridlocked, and he finally had to abandon his car.

It turns out that Tolik was able to make it on foot to the home of some friends, where he stayed until just before midnight. He then returned to his car, found it undamaged, and was able to drive home.

Has the Kiev team resumed sorties (tract-passing expeditions) downtown?

Yes. As soon as the metro was running again, our missionaries were back out on the streets. In fact, our people returned to Maydan the day after the massacre and handed out a broadside (gospel tract) titled “Arsenal.” Its message: no arsenal is more powerful than God’s, and His invincible “weapon” is love.  Please pray for the gospel seed that was sown.

How is the JFJ staff doing in terms of emotional and spiritual wellness?

Tolik says, “It is better now for everyone, but even in the midst of the conflict our staff did well enough, and prayed for our country all the time.” Naturally, our staff in Kiev and other cities throughout Ukraine are very concerned about what is going on in Crimea and all would appreciate prayer for their country.

What about Ira and the field hospital she was coordinating?

Ira reports, “Because of the shootings there were so many wounded that people set up field hospitals all over the city. Many were in tents. Some were in churches. A pastor friend of mine volunteered his church’s building. Doctors from different hospitals, private clinics, even retired doctors and student nurses – all were willing to come and work in them.

“As the telephone coordinator of a field hospital, I receive phone calls from the wounded, from volunteers, from doctors, from drivers and direct them to our facility. The greatest difficulty has been for the wounded policemen because many volunteers were unwilling to come and care for them. But we have sorted this out, too, because as believers, we don’t care who is an alleged enemy and who is not – all the wounded need help.

“Now, on top of the physical wounds, we have to deal with the post-traumatic stress and post-war syndrome of thousands of people. Pray that we have wisdom in dealing with that!”