London branch missionary Simon Lissak at the WOW outreach

Alison B. reports: “During the last week of June, we had a team of Jews for Jesus staff and volunteers go to Wimbledon and Central London. We wrote a new gospel tract, ‘New Bulls Please.’ The team handed out 31,450 broadsides, received contact info from nine Jewish and 98 Gentile seekers and prayed with 24 people (one Jewish) to receive the Lord.

Here are some highlights:

Anne Lowe: “I met a young Muslim lady, Hannah,* and asked her if she would like to take a leaflet. She said she was in a hurry and went to cross the road. But the lights were red and she came back and said she had a minute. She asked me what it was about and I told her it was about Jesus. At this point she began crying. She told me that she had been praying to Jesus just then. She told me she believed in Jesus but she was a Muslim. I shared the gospel with her and she then said that she wanted to commit her life to Jesus.”


Alison: “I rang Hannah the following day. She told me that she had had a dream about Jesus twenty years ago and that He had held out His hand to her to take. Ever since, whenever she was desperate or anxious she would pray to Jesus. She had been desperate the day she met Anne on the street, and had just asked Jesus to put His hands on her heart to calm her when Anne offered her a leaflet about Jesus. I asked Hannah if I could put her in touch with a friend whose Iranian husband converted from Islam to Christianity. It turned out that Hannah is Iranian too, as is her husband, and that he already believes in Jesus. How amazing that God knows exactly what we need when we need it!”


More from Anne Lowe: “I was near the end of the sortie when a young woman, Georgina, asked for a broadside. Her father was Jewish, her mother Irish Catholic and she was searching. I explained the gospel and she agreed with all of it. I asked her if she would like to belong to Jesus and she said yes. So she prayed with me to receive Jesus. She was very joyful and said she would be happy to meet up with one of the JFJ female missionaries.”


Jeff Goss: “As I was speaking to people who were waiting in the long queue for Wimbledon tickets, I met a young Afro-Caribbean man, Conor, from Northampton, who was very open. I told him that today was the day of salvation. I felt he was convicted by the Holy Spirit and really understood the gospel message. I started praying with him and then the queue started moving. By the time he’d finished praying, we had moved a long way from where we started, but now he was also in relationship with Jesus!

“Many people were mocking, but then I witnessed to three 18-year-olds who were ready to pray the prayer of salvation. It was amazing to see the Holy Spirit working in these young lives, even tears in their eyes. All the people in the line could hear the conversation—a real captive audience!”


Julia Pascoe: “I was in Hatton Garden with a campaigner named Nathalie. Several Jewish people stopped, intrigued about why we were there. Max, a Jewish man I had met the day before, remembered my name and agreed to take another broadside. I also met Miriam, who asked why as a Jew I would believe in Jesus. I explained that I had been challenged by the Scriptures. She asked if I meant the New Testament and I told her I meant the Tanakh as well. As I shared some Messianic prophecies, she began to cry. She said that it was hay fever, but I thought that she had been moved. She said she loved God so much. I said that Yeshua had died for us so that we could be forgiven for our sins and she said she was always asking God for forgiveness. It was a really significant conversation for this Jewish woman to speak so openly about these things.”


Paul Nifah: “I was in Central London and met a Hindu man, Kanian. I asked him who he thought Jesus was, and he said that Jesus was a Christian god. I went on to explain who Jesus is and how he had become the final sacrifice for all our sins, enabling us to enter into a relationship with God. Kanian said he wanted to know Jesus for himself, and we prayed together as he committed his life to Jesus.”


Alphonse Balou: “I was at Chancery Lane station. A well-dressed man came and asked for a leaflet. He shook my hand and told me he was a believer. He said that his boss is Jewish, and he planned to pass our broadside along to him.”


Matthew Seymour: “A woman approached me and said, ‘I am Muslim but I still want to know what you believe because of that T-shirt!’ I shared the gospel and that the Bible says that Jesus is the Son of God. She said the Koran says that Jesus is a prophet. I said that the Bible said he was more than that and he died and rose from the dead for our sins. She was now even more interested and wanted to know how we believed in the triune god. I showed her the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in the Hebrew Scriptures and explained that Jesus is 100% man and 100% God. Her interest was really piqued. I explained how it is impossible to be born a Christian, so she understood for the first time about being born again. She said for the first time she understood Christianity. She is a doctor and one of her colleagues has been telling her about Jesus.”


Passerby stops to chat about the new broadside

Simon Lissak: “We went to Bond Street, and I noticed a mezuzah on the door of an Israeli bank. I waited around there and a young Israeli came out. We talked a bit about God’s purpose in creating Israel and also the commands of Shabbat. He gave me his contact details.

“After four dry days of campaign the inevitable happened: it rained, and it rained long and hard. We used the opportunity to try some new forms of evangelism. During the Olympic campaign in 2012 I was struck by how many people talked to us as we traveled on the Tube. I wondered if we could make the train carriages sortie sites.

“So I took a team of three trained campaigners down on to the Central line. We made our way down to the platform, and even before we boarded the train, Cheryl was talking to a lapsed Roman Catholic about Jesus. As we boarded the train they ended up sitting next to each other and Cheryl was able to get her contact details!

“The system was simple. We sat down, turned to the person next to us and asked, “Can I ask you something? Who do you think Jesus is?” If the person did not want to talk we did not push it. If nobody wanted to talk we simply got up and got off at the next station and moved up a carriage. We continued this ‘sweep’ with a prearranged destination station.

“It was remarkable that with our friendly attitude and a sense of humor, people were willing to talk! We all got off safely at our destination station and then began the return journey. However there were delays and it was so crowded that you could not move. Eventually I found a space to stand. Seated next to me were two immaculately dressed women with bright yellow shopping bags.

“I took an opportunity to join their conversation with a joke. They looked up and we laughed. At the same time a seat right next to one of them became vacant and I sat down. A few moments later I asked one of the women, ‘Who do you think Jesus is?’ She looked at me as if I was mad! Then I pointed to my T-shirt and explained that I was Jewish and believed Jesus is our Messiah.

“They said they were Jewish too but did not believe in Jesus. I gave them a two-minute story and offered them both a gospel tract, which they both read. By now several other people were listening to this whole interaction and had heard the gospel simply proclaimed.

“Because of the environment we were in there was none of the usual hostility and we had a good open conversation. Neither of them wanted to give me their contact information but they both kept the leaflets as we pulled into the next station.”


Steve Maslin: “I was on Liverpool Street when a Jewish man came up to me and gave his contact details, saying he wants us to contact him to talk more! A Christian businessman also approached us and wanted leaflets because he has Jewish colleagues, one of whom commutes fortnightly (two weeks) from Tel Aviv to here.”


Taiwo Olugbenga: “I was on High Street distributing broadsides and feeling a bit discouraged because not many people were taking them. Then a member of a church in Wimbledon approached with a balloon and tied it to my bag! After a while I realized that I was handing out more tracts than before—and the reason? The balloon on my bag was attracting people to me!”


Barry B.: “We were just about to begin a sortie when a young Mexican man ran up and began to ask us some questions. Taiwo shared the gospel message with him. The man said that he was Jewish and his name was Abraham. He was happy to give us his contact details. Half an hour later, I shared the gospel with an elderly man, who was open and friendly. He said he was Indian and Jewish. He was happy to give me his phone number. And his name was… Abraham!”


Ziggy Rogoff: “I met an older Jewish woman when I was doing some reconnaissance before the WOW outreach. I was wearing the ‘Jesus is Messiah’ T-shirt. She told me she was Jewish and then she got on the bus. I felt badly that I had not made more effort to speak to her. On the penultimate day of the actual outreach, I saw her again and we began to chat. She told me she wasn’t interested in talking about Jesus and she was too old to change.

“Her name is Charlotte, and she is 89 and originally from Slovakia. I told her that is where my grandmother was from. I asked her how she came to be living in the UK. She told me that her parents had sent her away to school in London and that both her parents were killed in the Holocaust. Her father died in Auschwitz and her mother had died on the forced march. During the war Charlotte had been studying medicine.

“I told her that I am named after my great grandfather who died at Auschwitz, and I gave her a gospel leaflet which had my name on it. She said that because of what had happened to her family, she didn’t believe in God. Our conversation continued just a little longer. It was an extraordinary meeting with an extraordinary woman. Please pray for Charlotte to contact us.”