Jews were among those in the forefront of the civil rights movement of 40 years ago, and Jewish people continue to be ardent supporters of equality and civil liberties today. We found some web sites that underscore this connection. Note that they reflect a variety of mainstream Jewish viewpoints–very likely, the viewpoints of some of your Jewish friends and neighbors. Can you think of a way to discuss these articles with Jewish people you know in such a way that would naturally lead to spiritual topics? Perhaps you can converse about civil rights and justice, mentioning that in your faith as a Christian, you believe that true justice can only come when human hearts are changed. Or perhaps you don’t know any Jewish people but are interested in such facts as: the oldest U.S. synagogue in continuous use (since 1794) is located in Charleston, S.C..

For articles on the relationship between Jews, Dr. King, and the civil rights movement, see http://www.socialaction.com/issues/human_civil/MartinLutherKingDay.shtml, where you’ll find such articles as “Living Dr. King’s Dream, Jewishly,” “Jews and Civil Rights,” and more. And notice the articles linking Martin Luther King Day with Tu b’Shvat (did you know that there is a Coretta Scott King Forest in Israel?).

Note that these articles were published in prior years; they may give a different date for Martin Luther King Day.

A Synagogue Sermon by Martin Luther King, Jr. It was February 26, 1965 when Temple Israel of Hollywood welcomed Martin Luther King Jr. into the pulpit. Now nearly 43 years later, you can still hear the sermon at http://www.jewishjournal.com/home/preview.php?id=17060 as two MP3 files (scroll down the page and the links will be on the right).

Recipes in Honor of Martin Luther King Day
http://www.uja.org/page.html?ArticleID=13314
Says author Joni Schockett, “On a recent trip to South Carolina, I purchased a wonderful little cookbook called ‘Kosher Southern-Style Cookbook,’ by Mildred Covert and Sylvia Gerson, Pelican Press, 1993. This lovely little book explores the Jewish heritage of our Southern states and takes us on a gastronomical tour of ten states. Each chapter includes some history of the state. Did you know that the oldest synagogue in continuous use (since 1794) is located in Charleston, S.C.? Enjoy some Southern-style recipes adapted from this delightful book in honor of Dr. King’s Southern heritage.”