For many Jewish people, December presents a dilemma. Regardless of the commercialization of Christmas, or its disconnect from a more probable date of Messiah’s birth, many find something peculiarly attractive about the holiday. And among the “many” there are, believe it or not, some Jewish people.

True, the Jewish people have Hanukkah. It is not a “Jewish Christmas.” And yet the lights and presents—plus the fact that it gets more attention than many of the Biblical holidays God commanded—can make Hanukkah seem like a convenient distraction from “that other holiday.”

You see, December can be a dilemma for Jewish people who have been brought up believing that Jesus is not for us Jews, that being Jewish means choosing not to wonder who He is, much less celebrate Him.

The celebration of God’s Messiah coming to earth is a joyous, year-round reality for those who know Him. Many of us also enjoy a special celebration of His birth at Christmas. But for certain people who don’t know Jesus, Christmas can be a time to wonder what He is all about, and why songs that talk about Israel and Messiah and peace and joy are enjoyed by Christians, while Jewish people are expected to ignore them.

We Jews for Jesus want to take the opportunity to say that Jewishness and faith in Jesus is not an either/or thing. We don’t have to choose either to be Jewish or to open our hearts to Jesus. He came to Jewish people in fulfillment of Jewish prophecies. Yes, He shook up the Jewish religious establishment, but that didn’t make Him less Jewish. It simply made Him more relevant to everyday Jewish people.

Please pray for our December outreaches throughout the world. Pray as we engage people in conversations about how Jesus is still relevant to everyday people, Jewish and Gentile alike. Now is a good time to challenge the “either/or” mindset. Here’s one fun way that our Chicago team is doing that.