Every person is unique. Our individuality is not expressed only in how we speak, or what we wear, or even the brand of cola we drink. Perhaps the one thing that most emphasizes our uniqueness is the different way that God uses to bring each of us to faith in Yeshua. The Scriptures do teach that the way to salvation is straight and narrow. There is just one way to be saved as declared in Acts 4:12. Yet this way to faith demonstrates that it is the power of God in its ability to reach each of us wherever we are. God’s Word does not need to change in order to reach us; yet certain aspects of the message are highlighted by the Holy Spirit to meet our needs as individuals. There is an elasticity to God’s Word that stretches the message so that it will speak to all who want to hear.

As I reflect on this truth it brings to mind a flood of memories of how people I know have come to saving faith in Yeshua. Each instance demonstrates that God loves us so much that he not only sent his son, but he sends the salvation message special delivery to each of us, in our own language, our own culture, and tailored to our experiences and needs.

One man who had drifted away from the orthodoxy of his parents was still searching for truth. His company transferred him from New York to San Francisco to open a new office. Of three employees he hired, one of them was a very committed believer. This Christian was not afraid to proclaim the gospel boldly to his Jewish boss. After four months of witness, this young Jewish businessman accepted Yeshua.

A young high school girl, torn by family problems, sought peace in her life that only God could give. Not knowing which way to turn, this teenager listened to the comforting words of a classmate. When the conversation turned to Jesus, the troubled young girl said, I am Jewish and I can’t accept that.” The eager friend said that she knew of other Jewish people who believed in Jesus. As this new relationship grew, the troubled young girl saw that Jesus was the answer and that being Jewish and believing in Jesus could go hand in hand.

Another, a man, had traveled around the world in search of a new home, a new land that would give him fresh opportunities in life. His past had been burdened with the sorrows and traumas that war produced. In his new home he was taking a casual stroll one sunny afternoon. He saw someone handing out pamphlets and took one out of curiosity. The broadside spoke of Jesus as Messiah. It raised questions about the man’s own Jewishness and his need for Messiah’s salvation. The man called the number on the back of the pamphlet. Later he dropped by a local branch office of Jews for Jesus. Perhaps his search, too, will end in faith.

All I can say is that for a straight and narrow path, the gospel certainly is broad. It is broad enough to accommodate everyone. This in itself is another aspect of the miracle of salvation.