Spiritual issues were always of interest to Solomon. Growing up in Montreal and beholding the religious diversity there, he always questioned the meaning of life. In this mainly Catholic city Solomon and his Jewish family were a minority. A Christian friend first got him thinking about God and Satan. The two opposites seemed to mesmerize him. At one point while growing up Solomon turned to his mother and asked her point-blank: "Mom, why are we here?" She was unable to answer.

As Solomon continued through school God brought Cynthia, a Christian, into his life. Cynthia invited him to a Youth for Christ meeting she attended. At first he turned her down, but after she persisted for some time, Solomon finally agreed to check it out.

It really was not surprising to Solomon to find out that Jesus was Jewish, but he really didn’t care one way or the other. Being Jewish had become just a label to him. The traditions and ceremonies seemed devoid of meaning. He felt there was not much point to them, and he even resented them a little. The Bible held a bit more fascination for him. There seemed to be meaning in this book, but Solomon just was not ready to start investigating its message.

Shortly after that, Solomon enrolled at the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario. During that time, immersed in a world of academia, Sol lost interest in spiritual things as he pursued his education. Surrounded by the distractions of college life, he felt no need for religious questions.

One day, about two years into his college experience, as Solomon was studying in the library he began to notice the students around him. They seemed to be busily studying, preparing for their careers. It started to dawn on him that they probably all had a direction they were working toward and a purpose to their endeavors—something he had forgotten in his hustle to get through the school semesters.

What in the world am I doing here? Sol asked himself that afternoon. What kind of a future do I have, and why am I here anyway? That old childhood question began to creep back into his thoughts.

Everything began to go grey! In all Sol’s studies and involvements there was just emptiness. He found no meaning, value, or point to it all. As he mulled this over from day to day, severe depression set in.

Solomon began seeing Karen. She was studying there at the university, and they started to date. One day Karen admitted that she had become a believer in Jesus. At first, Sol told her in no uncertain terms that she was never to talk to him about that, but then the old questions started coming back. Karen knew how to answer him from the Scriptures. To discover that the answers were really there astounded Sol.

Sol began going with Karen to the Bible studies she attended, and what he learned there really made sense. The New Testament was a completion of the Hebrew Scriptures, and it really did make perfect sense that the Messiah would be God in the flesh, the Son of God. It was a consistent, reasonable story, but was it true? How could one know if God existed?

Searching to find out for sure, threatened by the terror of discovering that it was true, but pursued by the desire to know, Solomon began meeting with a pastor. He read Christian cases for Jesus, and one summer he contacted Jews for Jesus.

It felt like he was living a dual life. He knew it was all true, and was virtually a Christian, yet he had not made a commitment and was still a part of the unbelieving world. Years later, in his bedroom in Toronto after a long evening of studying, Solomon decided it was the right time. He prayed and gave his life to Yeshua.

Many pieces of the puzzle have fit together now. As Solomon continues to grow in the Lord, he not only understands the Bible’s answer for meaning in life, he experiences it every day.