Some people were concerned that not enough folks were responding to the message of Christ and so they decided to form a committee. The committee then called in the experts, the consultants, the authors and all sorts of people who knew how to be successful. Everyone agreed that they needed to dress up the message to help people see how great and relevant it was. They decided to erect a huge think tank next to the church.

They would shape the message to suit certain people and create all kinds of eloquent language to reach various groups—the GenXers, the seniors, the boomers and the busters. Each one would be told the gospel story in his or her special language. They would attract the young people, the old people, the rich people—and if the poor were attracted they would help them on the outside (the poor didn’t fit the image that they wanted to project of themselves).

So the think tank
rumbled,
roared,
it roiled and toiled
and almost boiled over.

They came up with a pink gospel for girls, a blue gospel for boys, gospel toys for children, a gospel cookbook for housewives, a gospel dress-for-success guide for career people, a home run gospel for baseball fans and a touchdown gospel for football fans. When they finished, the committee knew that they could never trust the results to the people. After all, what would happen if a football fan got a home run gospel, or a senior got a GenX gospel? So they went back to the think tank and held seminars to teach the church folks how to give the right gospel to the right person.

Some people who had never been to church were curious when they saw the think tank. In fact, quite a crowd gathered to see what the rumbling and the roaring, the tumbling and the soaring was about. They were told that they would just have to wait until the committee could come up with the right gospel for each of them.

After the seminars, the committee realized that they would have to update their work. They had forgotten about the soccer fans who needed goal-centered gospels. Not only that, but one certainly couldn’t use the same gospel for sprinters and long distance runners. How would a mechanic ever understand the message that was being directed to a physician? Wouldn’t a professor be insulted if he got the gospel intended for a fast food worker?

Those who were seeking just had to seek elsewhere.

Those who were listening got tired of the din.

But there was one nine-year-old boy who watched as they rolled out the gospel they had devised. He stared and he stared, then asked his parents, Wasn’t it better before they dressed it up?”