I was enjoying a quiet evening at the dinner table with my family when the doorbell rang. We were expecting a friend to stop by, but the person at the door was not our expected visitor. Instead, there stood a lady we didn’t know. She was visibly upset. Tearfully she related a deeply painful story, describing how her husband had just beaten her and left.

The reason she had come to our door was that she had seen the bumper sticker on my car. It said, Yeshua, the Jewish Way to Say Jesus.” The lady asked me if I was a Christian. When I said that I was, she seemed somewhat comforted and explained that she needed a ride to her best friend’s house. She felt that she would be safe there. I said that I would take her.

On the drive to her friend’s house, the woman fought through her pain and tears to tell me that she “used to be a Christian,” but that the problems in her life had made her wonder if God existed, No longer did she even know how to pray. Where was God while she was having all these troubles?

I had the perfect opportunity at that point to tell her about God’s endless love and care for her. I explained that God wanted our simple prayers of faith, and that he knew what we needed. I did my best to explain the evil of the human heart without God that often makes us hurt one another, but that God could heal every hurt, even hers.

I had been pulled away from my family time to minister to someone in need, and I had been able to help her. It gave me a special feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction that only a Christian can experience in having made oneself available—available to Jesus for service.

It was only a bumper sticker on a car, but one that pointed upward to Jesus. It was just that bumper sticker that God used as a beacon of light to a hurting soul who knew there was a good chance for getting help from the person who owned the car. It was only a bumper sticker, but through it I was made available to someone who needed to hear about God’s love.

I am eternally grateful that God makes us available to be his messengers by using little things—sometimes just a bumper sticker.