Ed: Last December we had a chart comparing Christmas and Hanukkah and invited you to send us some of the traditional foods you eat at Christmas. Thanks to each who wrote back. I’m sorry we only had space for a couple:

Mildred McKeehan of Miami, Florida has finally got me to rethink my position on fruitcake. She wrote:

I always like to eat fruit cake on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day or both. The fruit in the cake reminds me of the fruit of the Spirit mentioned in Galatians 5:22-23: ‘love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance.'”

Also, Phyllis Ensrud of Daly City, California sent a heart-warming contribution:

“Seventy plus years ago when I was a small child, I was a bit overwhelmed by all the sewing, knitting, decorating of the house, baking for guests and mysterious whispered secrets between family members.

“In an effort to explain the meaning of the season, Mom told me that it was to celebrate Jesus’ birthday. I knew about birthday celebrations and so asked, ‘What kind of birthday cake will you make for Him?’ Mom thought for a while and said that an angel food cake ought to be just right.

“Because this was during the Depression and before the invention of electric beaters, even my child’s mind grasped how special the occasion was to be since so many expensive eggs were required and it took so long to get the egg whites stiff.

“After the baked cake was cooled, Mother frosted it with a simply snowy-white icing, put some green holly leaves with a few red berries around the base of the cake, and one 12-inch white candle in the center hole. On Christmas Day, she let me bring the cake to the table while we all sang, ‘Happy Birthday to You, dear Jesus.’

“Thus began a family tradition carried on all these years, now for my parents’ great-grandchildren.”