Missionary work is full of questions—those that people ask us, those we ask others to get them to think about the gospel, and those we ask ourselves. These experiences of some of the members of our Liberated Wailing Wall Mobile Evangelistic Team represent some of the queries we encounter.


The hostess with whom my teammate and I were staying was renting the apartment o

n the side of her house to David, a 29-year-old Jewish man who did not believe in Jesus. When we expressed an interest in meeting David, she invited him to dinner. He accepted, knowing that we were with Jews for Jesus. When he entered wearing a yarmulke (skullcap) and tzitzit (fringes), we knew we were in for an interesting evening. David obviously took his Jewishness seriously.

Unmarried and a substitute teacher, David was not shy. He had many questions. He asked the name of our music group. I told him it was The Liberated Wailing Wall and asked him what he thought of the idea of Jews for Jesus. He said he had heard of it before and felt it was OK for us to believe. He had attended a Baptist college and many people had told him about Jesus. He said he was not raised to believe in Jesus, his family didn’t practice much Jewishness, but he was leaning toward Orthodox Judaism. I asked him his purpose in keeping all those complex rules, and he said he was trying to reach God. I asked him if he was sure that one day he would reach God. He said he hoped so, and that the real joy was in the search.

Why search if you never find the answer?” I asked. I told him that I was sure I had reached God. I gave him my whole story—that I too had been brought up to not believe in Jesus, but I had found him to be the Messiah for whom the Jewish people are waiting.

I asked David what he thought about God’s nature. He started talking about God’s holiness, but in the next breath he said that God might have made a mistake to kill everyone except Noah in the flood.

“How can we question what God does or doesn’t do?” I challenged. “It would be like an ant questioning a human, but even more so. You said that God was holy. That means that He cannot tolerate sin, right?”

David agreed. “Then how are we made right in His eyes?” I asked.

David didn’t have an answer for that. I challenged him to ask the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob to show him the truth. He said that he already had done that, and that he had read the New Testament. I told him to ask again and read again, this time with an open heart, genuinely in search of the truth. Then our conversation became lighter and we enjoyed a time of seeing slides of our host’s missionary travels.

David seems to keep on having contact with born-again believers. Please pray for this Orthodox Jewish man, that soon he will realize the truth he has been trying to find by good deeds instead of faith.