David Philipson, 29, was born in North Carolina and currently resides in Southern California. He grew up in a home where both his Jewish mother and gentile father believed in Jesus, and David came to believe in him at a very young age.

“I grew up with a ton of Jewish culture and symbolism, but we loved our Christmas trees too,” says David. “The family has been to Israel several times and we celebrate Jewish holidays along with Christian holidays.”

David studied photography and digital imagery at Tel Aviv University and has traversed the globe, alone, several times, recording his journeys through the lens of his camera.

“One thing that baffles me is that every person in the world is unique,” he says. “I love capturing images of ordinary humans doing ordinary things in environments exotic to those of us in the West. The “aha” moment—when you look down at the camera and see the perfect shot—is very addictive. I love it!”

David’s thoughts on art:

“I believe that originally art was intended to capture beauty—to mimic God’s creation. Over the past few centuries, some genres within the umbrella of art have lost that focus and have become anti-art, focusing on disorder and emptiness—to mimic the human condition.

“The motivation of my art is to show the beauty of the individual in a cultural context. I am motivated by relationship and I feel we can learn to understand and empathize with others from different walks of life when we take time to just see them.

His thoughts as a Jewish artist who believes in Jesus:

“For hundreds of years, Jews have been the wandering people, without a place to call home. Now that Israel has been restored, I believe as a Zionist our home is Israel. I also know that my true home is in the kingdom of God. One of my favorite sayings of Yeshua (Jesus), found in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, is: “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” I love showing the joy and creativity and emotion in children’s faces in my art, because I know that is what we should strive for: faith like a child.”