No Jew who lived through the merciless devastation of the Holocaust emerged unscarred. Many Jews responded either by rejecting God or even hating Him. Rachmiel Frydland in his recent book, When Being Jewish Was a Crime, presents another perspective.

Mr. Frydland grew up in Poland where he was in training for the rabbinate. As a young man, he met a Jewish Christian who showed him how clearly the Scriptures portrayed Jesus as the Messiah. Struggle as he might, he could find nothing in the Jewish Bible to refute this and soon Frydland became a believer in Jesus. That was in 1936.

In 1939, Hitler invaded Poland. Frydland was young and strong. He managed to survive the war hiding from, and in some cases, actually escaping from, the Nazis. The rest of his family was not so fortunate. Like so many others, Frydland lost all those who were dear to him, including his young wife.

After the war, Frydland moved to the United States where his great knowledge of the Torah and the rabbinic writings has made him one of the leading scholars among Jewish Christians today. When Being Jewish Was a Crime is not a book written in a dry, scholarly style. For any who are concerned about the effects of the Holocaust, this book is worth reading. It is not syrupy or saccharine, but it is a book that offers a hope that is missing in Wiesel, Singer and other commentators on the Holocaust.