“Chodesh Adar”

Did you know this is the month of Adar*? But what is the month of Adar? Is it the last month in the Jewish calendar? Let’s find out.

The fourteenth day of the last month of the year, which is during Chodesh Adar (month of Adar). marks the festive holiday of Purim and must be celebrated in Adar Bet** (see Esther 3:7) in a leap year. As it says in the book of Esther this is always to be celebrated a month before Pesach (Passover).

During both Purim and Pesach (Passover) it is celebrated as God’s deliverance of his people, and therefore, Adar is considered one of the happiest months of the Jewish year. Adar comes from the book of Esther and even though the name of God is not mentioned in the book of Esther it is clearly represented here in the celebration of salvation. Salvation brings us much joy just as it is written in the Talmud, “When Adar comes, Joy is increased” (Ta’anit 29a).

Adar is a month to rejoice over salvation. Something we love to rejoice over is our salvation through Yeshua. We would love to hear why you think it could be important to rejoice over salvation and what salvation and rejoicing over it means to you. Please chat with us live or leave us a message.

Footnotes:

*Adar (?????) is actually the twelfth month of the Jewish calendar, counting from the month of “Nisan” (first month). Adar has 29 days in it, or 30 if it is a leap year and it is between the months of February and March.

** When it is a leap year, Adar is actually added a second time called Adar Sheni (second Adar) Adar Bet (Adar II) and sometimes called Ve’adar (Additional Adar).   Adar I is considered the "extra" month. As a result, someone born in Adar during a non-leap year would celebrate his birthday in Adar II during a leap year.