Did spring cleaning start as a Jewish tradition or didn’t it? Let’s find out.

For a full month before Pesach (Passover), Jews around the world start cleaning out their houses in preparation for the holiday. This is done in obedience to the Torah’s (first five books of Moses) command in Exodus 12:15:

“Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread. On the first day you shall remove leaven out of your houses, for if anyone eats what is leavened, from the first day until the seventh day, that person shall be cut off from Israel.”

Leavened bread (bread with yeast) and other foods with leaven are removed throughout the entire house, not even leaving a crumb, for each item of leaven represents sin.

Some of you may know that our missionaries are asked to present Christ in the Passover in churches and congregations around the country.  They share the Good News that Yeshua’s blood on the cross accomplished the removal of all of our sin. That’s a lot of leaven!

We are commanded to remove all of the leaven because it also represents impurity, and Yeshua was nothing but pure. Removing all of the leavened bread leaves us with unleavened bread called matzoh. This whole process is like a “spring cleaning,” symbolizing the cleansing of our souls from sin.

Another thing mentioned in our Christ in the Passover services is that the unleavened bread (Matzoh) is pierced, just as Yeshua was. So Yeshua can be seen here, even in the preparation for Pesach (Passover).

We would love to hear what Jewish traditions you take part in, and if you think that, even in the preparation for Passover, Yeshua is represented. Please chat with us live or leave us a message (see the bottom right corner of this page).